The Wadman Way

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The Wadman Way

Wadman's twins Harper and Wyatt bring laughter into her life. (Courtesy of Becca Wadman)

Wadman's twins Harper and Wyatt bring laughter into her life. (Courtesy of Becca Wadman)

Wadman's twins Harper and Wyatt bring laughter into her life. (Courtesy of Becca Wadman)

Wadman's twins Harper and Wyatt bring laughter into her life. (Courtesy of Becca Wadman)

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“Come on we’re a big happy family here in E-Block!” Strength and Conditioning Coach Becca Wadman coaxes a shy, apprehensive freshman boy to demonstrate the proper hinge position in her morning Mind, Body, Brain class. I wouldn’t be quick to call this group of awkward freshman sitting a few lengths away from one another a family, but with her bright blonde high ponytail, upbeat personality, and infectious laugh, Wadman – a coach, a trainer, and a mom to twins – can turn the most incompatible group of people into a family.

Family. When thinking about this strange E-Block Mind, Body, Brain family, I am reminded of my sophomore year and in particular, my first experiences with Wadman as a coach and mentor. I was thrown into the JV Lacrosse team having never played before. Coaching a team filled with loud-mouthed and lazy second-semester seniors and nervous and shy underclassmen, Wadman’s perfect balance between patience and passion helped a group of unmotivated, P.E. requirement seekers find comfort and fun in the game of lacrosse. Under the leadership of Wadman, we became a family. A kinship so strong that when a handful of players were asked to play for the varsity team in the middle of the season, many refused in order to remain a part of the Wadman family.

Wadman helps freshmen in Mind, Body, Brain find their balance both physically and mentally.

For Wadman, it all goes back to family. It was her family that pushed her into playing sports in the first place, and it was the families she created on the field, court, and rink that kept her in the industry. Thus, it is no surprise that when asked to reflect on her upbringing, Wadman’s thoughts go straight to spending time with both her immediate family and athletics family. “When I was a freshman, my sister was a junior and my other sister was a senior in high school, which was really fun. I think one of the important things that my parents always instilled in us was a sense of team sports. I think the values that I learned in participating in those team sports has helped me grow into the individual in the workplace as well as the relationships that I have with my friends and my family and now as a mom, in terms of patience,” Wadman reminisces.

Wadman spent her early years playing team sports and spending time with her family. (Courtesy of Becca Wadman)

 

Patience. Patience is a thing Wadman is always in need of. Balancing being a mother of twins, owning a CrossFit gym, all while working at Marin Academy can be quite stressful at times. Luckily, Wadman finds resolve in the two things she loves the most: her family and fitness. When describing her hectic schedule, Wadman points to moments spent with her twins as her favorite parts of the day: “They just make me laugh all day long, well not all day long; every day they make me laugh. That’s what keeps me going.” But, when things do get frustrating, Wadman also turns to the resource of fitness: “having the release of working out and fitness it actually saves me emotionally,” Wadman claims.

The apprehensive freshman boy now walks up to the front of the class and attempts to lift a kettlebell weight as Becca instructed to do so. To much of the chagrin of his classmates, this lanky kid arches his back dramatically, prompting laughter from his classmates who find humor in his failed demonstration of hinge position. This was a rare moment when I see the mostly relaxed and upbeat Wadman, furrow her brows in annoyance: “You guys, don’t laugh.” She turns to the boy, “You got it. It’s okay, you’re doing a really great job. I promise,” she says with conviction. Her reassurance and guidance allows the boy to feel at home, feel comfortable enough to laugh off his mistake and perfectly execute the position.

Wadman helps build confidence within her E-Block Mind, Body, Brain students.

Confidence. The feeling of confidence is what brought Wadman to the fitness industry in the first place. Wadman moved to the Bay Area on a whim. In true Wadman fashion, she let her optimism outweigh her concern and moved with her now-husband from the East Coast, having only known him for a couple of months and having never set foot in California before. Unsure about her career path, she worked in finance and ad sales for 10 years, before realizing her true love for fitness: “I think the biggest thing that I noticed was a confidence in myself that I was applying to the workplace and to relationships outside of the workplace and I started to see myself change not just physically, but I think also emotionally and mentally, as well.”

And it is the desire to see others grow that led Wadman to pursue strength training as a career. Wadman’s self-proclaimed favorite aspect of her profession is “being able to help people push beyond their boundaries and see them build that confidence in themselves and see how they relate to life outside of the gym and outside of fitness.”

Wadman helps a student overcome physical and mental challenges with their bodies.

Legacy. Wadman wouldn’t be where she is today if it weren’t for the influence of her mother. When asking Wadman how she even got introduced to the athletics in the first place, one person came to mind. Wadman recounts, “I think it started [with] my mom definitely pushing us again into those team sports. She played teams sports. She was a field hockey player growing up, and I think she saw the value of that at a young age.”

After our conversation ran its course, Wadman shared concerns that she was too boring of a subject to profile. I reassure her that any mother who can balance owning a business and working at a school while raising children has interesting stories and life lessons to tell. Wadman agrees, as she once again remembers her own mother. Wadman’s mother passed away when she was eight months pregnant with her twins, but her ability beautifully to balance having a career and building a family remains with Wadman forever.

As Wadman faces one of her biggest challenges yet, moving to Chicago, she will find herself creating new families while helping her kids transition to a new city. It is safe to say by making her career, her passions, and her family one and the same, Wadman has truly honored and continues to honor her mother’s legacy.

Wadman’s life is heavily influenced by her immediate family. Wadman (middle), her two sisters, and her parents on a ski trip. (Courtesy of Becca Wadman)